DEVELOPING STAGES ANALYSIS Updated August 9 2015
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Apple Inc. Public-company

CUPERTINO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA — Apple Inc., (NASDAQ: AAPL) formerly Apple Computer Inc., is an American multinational corporation which designs and manufactures consumer electronics and software products. The company's best-known hardware products include Macintosh computers, the iPod and the iPhone. Apple software includes the Mac OS X operating system, the iTunes media browser, the iLife suite of multimedia and creativity software, the iWork suite of productivity software, and Final Cut Studio, a suite of professional audio and film-industry software products. The company operates more than 250 retail stores in nine countries and an online store where hardware and software products are sold. ... more less

STATE BY TRANSITION

Wheel position details:
Stage:
3
  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Stable growth
  • Organizational focus: Scale/Optimize
  • Main motivating force: Culture
  • Ideal role of leader: Grower
  • Source of inspiration: Inside
  • Cohesion trend: Integration
  • Company attractiveness: Buy/hold
  • Breakup risk:
Leader:
 
  • Role: Grower
  • Reign: 2011 - Present
  • Fit:
    - Leader fits organization
Transition slider

STAGES OVER TIME

TIMELINE SUMMERY

STAGE TRANSITION PERIOD STAGE
Organizational focus to:Scale / Optimize 2011 -  
3
Organizational focus to:Innovate / Nurture 1997 - 2011
2
Organizational focus to:Explore / Discover 1996 - 1997
1
Organizational focus to:Confront / Purify 1993 - 1996
4
Organizational focus to:Scale / Optimize 1983 - 1993
3
Organizational focus to:Innovate / Nurture 1976 - 1983
2
LEADERSHIP TRANSITION REIGN ROLE
Tim Cook 2011 -   Grower
 
Steve Jobs 1997 - 2011 Builder
 
Gil Amelio 1996 - 1997 Transformer
 
Michael Spindler 1993 - 1996 Reformer
 
John Sculley 1983 - 1993 Grower
 
Steve Jobs 1976 - 1983 Builder
 
Note: Consult Timeline with sources below for supporting material.

ESSAY

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As the third stage of natural organization suggests, Tim Cook, a grower, can be expected to expand the company with products and services, such as the iWatch, while balancing the multiple roles involved at deeper and deeper levels.

Apple will likely grow for a few more years until it either saturates the niches that it helps create and/or when disruptive competitive products emerge that it is unable to counter stricken in a web of its own making - see Microsoft.  

HISTORICAL NOTES

Established by Steve Jobs, Apple is rare in that it escapes a breakup and manages to embark on a second cycle of growth.

The first time around, Jobs is succeeded by the then president of PepsiCo - cum marketing executive, John Sculley. Sculley significantly grows the company by scaling up and optimizing the business. Yet, he fails when it comes to product innovation.

When his brainchild, the handheld Newton computer, flops, Sculley is replaced by Michael Spindler who assumes a role as reformer. Spindler confronts Apple’s organizational complexity at the time and tries to purify it. When he fails to do the latter, he is replaced by Gil Amelio.

However short Amelio’s stint at Apple, he fulfills a role as transformer, not just by laying off employees but also by initiating various R&D projects. In need of a new Operating System, Amelio eventually buys NeXt. This brings Steve Jobs, NeXt's founder, back to Apple - as advisor initially.

When Amelio is ousted, Jobs picks the low-hanging fruit from the projects that Amelio endorsed. The rest is history. In 2011, when Jobs leaves the company to die, Tim Cook assumes the reigns and starts to scale up and optimize the business, a process that has continued since.

 

​If you'd like to share, follow or like this analysis, login first.

As the third stage of natural organization suggests, Tim Cook, a grower, can be expected to expand the company with products and services, such as the iWatch, while balancing the multiple roles involved at deeper and deeper levels.

Apple will likely grow for a few more years until it either saturates the niches that it helps create and/or when disruptive competitive products emerge that it is unable to counter stricken in a web of its own making - see Microsoft.  

HISTORICAL NOTES

Established by Steve Jobs, Apple is rare in that it escapes a breakup and manages to embark on a second cycle of growth.

The first time around, Jobs is succeeded by the then president of PepsiCo - cum marketing executive, John Sculley. Sculley significantly grows the company by scaling up and optimizing the business. Yet, he fails when it comes to product innovation.

When his brainchild, the handheld Newton computer, flops, Sculley is replaced by Michael Spindler who assumes a role as reformer. Spindler confronts Apple’s organizational complexity at the time and tries to purify it. When he fails to do the latter, he is replaced by Gil Amelio.

However short Amelio’s stint at Apple, he fulfills a role as transformer, not just by laying off employees but also by initiating various R&D projects. In need of a new Operating System, Amelio eventually buys NeXt. This brings Steve Jobs, NeXt's founder, back to Apple - as advisor initially.

When Amelio is ousted, Jobs picks the low-hanging fruit from the projects that Amelio endorsed. The rest is history. In 2011, when Jobs leaves the company to die, Tim Cook assumes the reigns and starts to scale up and optimize the business, a process that has continued since.

 

TIMELINE

END OF ANALYSIS

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  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Uncertain growth
  • Organizational focus: Explore/Discover
  • Main motivating force: Conviction
  • Ideal role of leader: Transformer
  • Source of inspiration: Inside
  • Cohesion trend: Fragmentation
  • Company attractiveness: Sentiment driven
  • Breakup risk:
  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Rising growth
  • Organizational focus: Innovate/Nurture
  • Main motivating force: Vision
  • Ideal role of leader: Builder
  • Source of inspiration: Outside
  • Cohesion trend: Integration
  • Company attractiveness: Buy/hold
  • Breakup risk:
  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Stable growth
  • Organizational focus: Scale/Optimize
  • Main motivating force: Culture
  • Ideal role of leader: Grower
  • Source of inspiration: Inside
  • Cohesion trend: Integration
  • Company attractiveness: Buy/hold
  • Breakup risk:
  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Declining growth
  • Organizational focus: Confront/Purify
  • Main motivating force: Openness
  • Ideal role of leader: Reformer
  • Source of inspiration: Outside
  • Cohesion trend: Fragmentation
  • Company attractiveness: Sentiment driven
  • Breakup risk: Partial or total