DEVELOPING STAGES ANALYSIS Updated August 11 2015
Logo of Russia

Russia Nation

Russia or, officially known as the Russian Federation, is a country situated in northern Eurasia. It is a federal semi-presidential republic. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland, Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia, and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk, the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait and Canada's Arctic islands. At 17,075,400 square kilometres, Russia is the largest country in the world, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area. Russia is also the world's ninth most populous nation with 143 million people as of 2012. Extending across the entirety of northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans nine time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms.
The nation's history began with that of the East Slavs, who emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century.
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STATE BY TRANSITION

Russia
Wheel position details:
Stage:
4
  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Declining growth
  • Organizational focus: Confront/Purify
  • Main motivating force: Openness
  • Ideal role of leader: Reformer
  • Source of inspiration: Outside
  • Cohesion trend: Fragmentation
  • Company attractiveness: Sentiment driven
  • Breakup risk: Partial or total
Leader:
 
  • Role: Grower
  • Reign: 1999 - Present
  • Fit:
    - Leader lags organization
Transition slider

STAGES OVER TIME

TIMELINE SUMMERY

STAGE TRANSITION PERIOD STAGE
Organizational focus to:Confront / Purify 2012 -  
4
Organizational focus to:Scale / Optimize 1999 - 2012
3
Organizational focus to:Innovate / Nurture 1991 - 1999
2
Organizational focus to:Explore / Discover 1985 - 1991
1
LEADERSHIP TRANSITION REIGN ROLE
Vladimir Putin 1999 -   Grower
 
Boris Yeltsin 1991 - 1999 Builder
 
Mikhail Gorbachev 1985 - 1991 Transformer
 
Note: Consult Timeline with sources below for supporting material.

ESSAY

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The Russian Federation today offers an unfortunate example of 'stage dictatorship'.

Stage dictatorships develop when leaders, who are successful in running one stage in the emergence of a 'societal expression', believe they can sustain their reign - typically stifling their nation or organization in the process. Often, the reason given is that these leaders do not trust the policies of those who may succeed them, leaders necessarily with a different stage perspective than theirs.

The last head of state of the USSR, Mikhail Gorbachev, was a transformer-type leader who helped reinvent his nation. Gorbachev saw to the acknowledgement of glasnost (openness), perestroika (restructuring), democratization, and the need for accelerated economic development.

Gorbachev was succeeded by Boris Yeltsin, who, in a builder-type leadership role, established the Russian Federation as we know it today.

Yeltsin, in turn, was succeeded by Vladimir Putin. During his first two terms, Putin functioned as grower-type leader riding on a booming worldwide economy and income generated by steadily increasing oil exports. By the time his two terms in office had ended, Putin had manipulated the system to ensure that a straw man, Dmitry Medvedev, would take his place.

After one term of Medvedev, Putin took over the reigns again. Now effectively in his fourth term, Putin is holding his nation in a stranglehold. As a result, the Russian economy is sliding down hill. What is worse, the political freedom of its citizens is being curbed and so is the freedom of some of the neighboring countries.

Clearly, the Russian Federation is in need of a reformer-type leader, not Putin.

The chances of Russia breaking up are clear in its present Stage 4 of development (read Source 'The Peril beyond Putin' under TIMELINE). The chances will increase (as they did in the Soviet Era) as Putin continues to centralize decision making - hoping to hang on to power this way. 

NOTE

However much the hunger for power is blamed for the behavior of leaders such as Putin, we believe that ‘stage illiteracy’ is the main reason why leaders and their following allow themselves to fall into the trap of stage dictatorship. In politics as well as in business, leaders appear to be unwilling to admit the adverse side effects of preventing 'human expressions' from advancing in their natural 4-stage cycle of emergence. Some of these leaders shamelessly sustain the stranglehold of their stage-specific perspective through a network of accomplices. Hence, we dare say, a new leadership ethos is also needed. 

Source: Improving Democracy: A Pipe Dream?

​If you'd like to share, follow or like this analysis, please, login first.

The Russian Federation today offers an unfortunate example of 'stage dictatorship'.

Stage dictatorships develop when leaders, who are successful in running one stage in the emergence of a 'societal expression', believe they can sustain their reign - typically stifling their nation or organization in the process. Often, the reason given is that these leaders do not trust the policies of those who may succeed them, leaders necessarily with a different stage perspective than theirs.

The last head of state of the USSR, Mikhail Gorbachev, was a transformer-type leader who helped reinvent his nation. Gorbachev saw to the acknowledgement of glasnost (openness), perestroika (restructuring), democratization, and the need for accelerated economic development.

Gorbachev was succeeded by Boris Yeltsin, who, in a builder-type leadership role, established the Russian Federation as we know it today.

Yeltsin, in turn, was succeeded by Vladimir Putin. During his first two terms, Putin functioned as grower-type leader riding on a booming worldwide economy and income generated by steadily increasing oil exports. By the time his two terms in office had ended, Putin had manipulated the system to ensure that a straw man, Dmitry Medvedev, would take his place.

After one term of Medvedev, Putin took over the reigns again. Now effectively in his fourth term, Putin is holding his nation in a stranglehold. As a result, the Russian economy is sliding down hill. What is worse, the political freedom of its citizens is being curbed and so is the freedom of some of the neighboring countries.

Clearly, the Russian Federation is in need of a reformer-type leader, not Putin.

The chances of Russia breaking up are clear in its present Stage 4 of development (read Source 'The Peril beyond Putin' under TIMELINE). The chances will increase (as they did in the Soviet Era) as Putin continues to centralize decision making - hoping to hang on to power this way. 

NOTE

However much the hunger for power is blamed for the behavior of leaders such as Putin, we believe that ‘stage illiteracy’ is the main reason why leaders and their following allow themselves to fall into the trap of stage dictatorship. In politics as well as in business, leaders appear to be unwilling to admit the adverse side effects of preventing 'human expressions' from advancing in their natural 4-stage cycle of emergence. Some of these leaders shamelessly sustain the stranglehold of their stage-specific perspective through a network of accomplices. Hence, we dare say, a new leadership ethos is also needed. 

Source: Improving Democracy: A Pipe Dream?

TIMELINE

END OF ANALYSIS

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  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Uncertain growth
  • Organizational focus: Explore/Discover
  • Main motivating force: Conviction
  • Ideal role of leader: Transformer
  • Source of inspiration: Inside
  • Cohesion trend: Fragmentation
  • Company attractiveness: Sentiment driven
  • Breakup risk:
  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Rising growth
  • Organizational focus: Innovate/Nurture
  • Main motivating force: Vision
  • Ideal role of leader: Builder
  • Source of inspiration: Outside
  • Cohesion trend: Integration
  • Company attractiveness: Buy/hold
  • Breakup risk:
  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Stable growth
  • Organizational focus: Scale/Optimize
  • Main motivating force: Culture
  • Ideal role of leader: Grower
  • Source of inspiration: Inside
  • Cohesion trend: Integration
  • Company attractiveness: Buy/hold
  • Breakup risk:
  • Revenue, GDP, Activity: Declining growth
  • Organizational focus: Confront/Purify
  • Main motivating force: Openness
  • Ideal role of leader: Reformer
  • Source of inspiration: Outside
  • Cohesion trend: Fragmentation
  • Company attractiveness: Sentiment driven
  • Breakup risk: Partial or total